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Prepare For Winter Or Pay The Price!!!!!

Beachbumcook

Kansas Chapter member
The cold weather is fast approaching and it is time to prepare.

1) Use 5W-40 synthetic oil for easier cold weather starts.

2) Make sure your batteries are charged and have them checked (disconnect one from the other) to get an accurate reading.

3) Use anti-gel additives to prevent fuel gelling and the extra cetane boost is always a plus!! Read the lables... not all brands provide cetane boost but they make "claim" that they aid in fuel mileage (read the fine print as they do not have cetane boost (Howes is perfect example of no cetane and why it costs less than Powerservice and Stanadyne).

I use MSR camping fuel bottles to store my additive in my truck since they will not leak or breakdown like water bottles and other plastic bottles people use. Iuse the large 32oz bottle and use as needed... but I tend to always double-treat and always do in the winter months!!!

The image below of the gelled up 6.0L fuel filter (primary filter) is whay the use of additves is important. NEVER rely on the truck-stop of gas station to properly treat their fuel. Changing a fuel filter on the side of the road in zero degree weather is a ***** (one I have never had to do).

Be a "Boy Scout" and be prepared....

MSR CAMPING FUEL BOTTLES:
http://i268.photobucket.com/albums/jj23/Beachbumcook/AdditiveFuelBottlesMSR.jpg


GELLED 6.0L PSD FUEL FILTER:
http://i268.photobucket.com/albums/jj23/Beachbumcook/Gelledup60LFuelFilter.jpg
 
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Beachbumcook

Kansas Chapter member
You forgot to add check your antifreeze in the coolant. Don't want to have it freeze and crack a block.

True... but since most (myself included) change our coolant every 50,000 miles and flush with distilled water when we do, I personally see no reason to check my coolant... but you are right... it would never hurt to do so.

Thanks for the reminder... it's a good one.
 
I've followed the precautions that Jeff outlined above and have not experienced a hickup. This summer I preemptively replaced my batteries with new 880 cca Napa batteries.
 

Beachbumcook

Kansas Chapter member
I've followed the precautions that Jeff outlined above and have not experienced a hickup. This summer I preemptively replaced my batteries with new 880 cca Napa batteries.

Besides better cold weather starting... new/fresh batteries ensure you don't fry your FICM control module (as some have done due to low voltage).

It's also nice that the industry has gone to 850-880 CCA's on this class of battery which is larger than what came stock a few years back.

More CCA's the better I always state!!!!
 
Nice tips Jeff. Attention to these details really helps us keep our 6.0 grin!
 

Beachbumcook

Kansas Chapter member
Great link about automotive batteries:

http://autos.msn.com/advice/CRArt.a...ndor=Paid+Inclusion&OCID=iSEMPI&crea=pi-autos


Most auto batteries are made by just three manufacturers, Delphi, Exide, and Johnson Controls Industries. Each makes batteries sold under several different brand names. Delphi makes ACDelco and some EverStart (Wal-Mart) models. Exide makes Champion, Exide, Napa, and some EverStart batteries. Johnson Controls makes Diehard (Sears), Duralast (AutoZone), Interstate, Kirkland (Costco), Motorcraft (Ford), and some EverStarts. Service centers such as Firestone, Goodyear, Pep Boys, and Sears tend to have a large, fresh inventory and relatively low prices. They also handle installation. Stores such as Kmart, Target, Trak Auto, and Wal-Mart may have the lowest prices, but not all of them can install a battery for you. Installing a battery yourself is not technically difficult, but it can be cumbersome, and you have to dispose of the old battery properly. Service stations and tune-up shops sell batteries as well, and they offer convenient and comprehensive service, but their selection tends to be limited and their stock may not be fresh. For cars and trucks still under warranty, a franchised dealer is your first choice, particularly if the vehicle warranty covers the battery. For older vehicles, though, a dealership is probably the last resort—it's the most expensive service venue. The two most crucial factors in choosing a battery are its "group size" and "cold-cranking amps," or CCA.

Buy a fresh battery—one manufactured less than six months earlier. Batteries are stamped with a date code, either on the battery's case or an attached label. The vital information is usually in the first two characters—a letter and a digit. Most codes start with the letter indicating the month: A for January, B for February, and so on. The digit denotes the year: 0 for 2000, say. For example, B3 stands for February 2003.
 
I got the power cord out to keep her warm on cold nights.
 

Bloodhound

Oilfield Trash
I live in louisiana. We don't have much cold weather down here. not like you guys do. Neither one of my trucks have a cord on the block heater. I think that i will put one on the ex though.
 

Beachbumcook

Kansas Chapter member
I got the power cord out to keep her warm on cold nights.

There you go.... I just put mine in the garage and put a blanket on her.

When it gets real cold, I to also plug in (even in the garage)...more for me to get "heat" coming out of the vents quicker... for my tender feet!!!!

Happy Thanksgiving,
 

UNRULEE

^LARGE carbon footprint^
I need to pick up one of those fuel bottles. Nice! Just last week I had my bottle of PS leak, whew, when I opened the door on the truck (it sat for about a week)the smell was pretty strong.
 

Beachbumcook

Kansas Chapter member
I need to pick up one of those fuel bottles. Nice! Just last week I had my bottle of PS leak, whew, when I opened the door on the truck (it sat for about a week)the smell was pretty strong.

Check Bass Pro, Cabela's, REI and the like.

Quality bottles and MSR will replace the screw caps if they break (or they did twice for me over the years). Quality stuff and great customer service!!!!
 
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