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bought a old/new ford

black_devil

babble babble
i bought a 1950 ford f-2 and im trying to determine the eng size and if its a numbers matching truck. i have the number off the fire wall but i have no other numbers. the glove box plate is missing and i cant find the tag on the trans bell housing. but where do i find it on the frame.
 

mtflat

Flatheads Forever
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Howdy! Mishawaka, huh? I spent 10 years in the Wakarusa area (84-94)

Welcome to FTF! Your F2 had one of 2 engines: 239 cid flathead V8 or the 226 cid six cylinder. If your vin prefix from the firewall is 98RD you have the V8. If your vin prefix is 97HD your truck originally was a flathead six.

The vin can be fround on the top frame rail, usually on the passenger side, near the motor mount.

Trucks of this series didn't do the bellhousing number - that was earlier flathead trucks.

Ford didn't do matching numbers, so you will be disappointed there. If it is either of the two above, you have the correct engine. Often when an engine wore out the dealer would swap in a factory rebuild for the customer. Ford put together a variety of assembled parts, not necessarily all from the same year. Flatheads from 1948 thru 1951 are all the same. A few minor changes were made for 52/53 but even then the blocks and most internal parts were the same.

If you have a firewall stamping, I can tell you the color, assembly plant, date of assembly and vehicle down the line. Also keep in mind 49 and 50 used the same serial number string. We've been working to figure out the cut-off number between the years for the past 12 years or so.
 
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mtflat

Flatheads Forever
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147
What you have is the vin from the firewall data plate. It only tells that it is either a 49 or 50 (9) flathead V8 (8R) F2 (D) and a late 50 by the high serial string likely built in August of that year. KC tells that it was produced at Kansas City assembly plant.

The firewall stamping I referred to is a string of numbers/letters stamped directly into the firewall or cowl, approximately 1/2" high. Some trucks got them, some didn't. What you're looking for is something like this:

My own 48 from Richmond CA is stamped 7RHI2L6320.

Ford used the capital letter I in place of 1 and 6 and 9 were the same stamp, just upside down.
 

mtflat

Flatheads Forever
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147
Some came with heaters. Most were dealer add-ons of several varieties depending on location.

The frame number is the same as on your firewall tag minus the KC. There should be a hollow star at either end of the number.

The cowl info can be either above or below the seam on the firewall - I generally call everything below the body seam the firewall and everything above the seam as cowl. They can be anywhere but most are just right of center - looking at the firewall from the front of the truck.

They may be stamped light or in a hurry with characters all over the place. KC stampings of that year tend to have a letter first: A, M, etc; then KC; then a number and letter - 15G; finally 3 or 4 numbers in a string
 

mtflat

Flatheads Forever
2,559
147
Sweet - you got it all!

M is the code for Meadow Green
KC code for Kansas City assembly plant
11G your truck was assembled August 11, 1950
129 the # of the vehicle down the assembly line

Check behind the tool box or behind the gas tank to find the original color. Or behind the kick panels by the door or under the dash.

Here's a pic of my 52 F2 in Meadow green
 

black_devil

babble babble
I'm not to worried about the original color but that is odd it must have been repainted red as the total says but the other info is great. Is there any problems outside the norm I should be aware of.( keep in mind I'm not a ford guy)

that thing in my poket
 

mtflat

Flatheads Forever
2,559
147
No unusual problems - normal things wear out, but these 3/4 tons were never used hard. Biggest problem is the ratio in the rear end is for crawling around back roads - not highway speeds. 45-50 is what they were designed for but swap in a "modern" rear (57-72 is almost a bolt-in) and you can keep up with traffic.

The 4 spd spur gear (straight cut) transmission means double clutching. And if the front end linkage is worn it will wander around all over the road.

But beside the few driveability issues, flathead powered trucks are just about bulletproof. Ask whatever questions you have as you go along. I'll be here to help come up with answers.

Come on over to flathead central to learn about these great little engines - check out the techno site about halfway down the page
http://www.flatheadsrus.com/
 
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mtflat

Flatheads Forever
2,559
147
My 48 F1 was originally Meadow Green, 2 different shades of red, blue and finally blue mixed with silver roof paint applied with a coarse brush.

It's hard to tell what po's (previous owners) may have done.
 

mtflat

Flatheads Forever
2,559
147
Whatever is coarse enough to scrub it off. The metal is heavy enough to stand about anything. 80 or 60 isn't too harsh

I took mine off with a chem stripper from NAPA - had to avoid the fumes, but didn't have the dust to deal with.
 

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