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2009 F150 = Real Photos

john112deere

caffeine junkie
Staff member
10,807
405
central Vermont
I guess I'm kinda old-fashioned on dash design.

I don't want a lot of buttons, but that's largely because I don't want any of the crap they turn on. I do vastly prefer buttons to those infernal touch-screens, though- talk about a nightmare to try to tune in a radio station while you're pulling a trailer in heavy traffic.

The big bars in the grille bother me, too. I understand that with fancy computer models, they can get enough airflow in around them, but why? Especially in a truck (built for work) more airflow is better, and that ugly grill isn't helping that situation.
 

dzltech

Ford Diesel Master
Don't know if anyone has said this,but the new Diesel Power magazine has an article on the 2010 150 and they are offering a v6 and v8 diesel in them with the v6 getting 49 mpg(so they say)
they are the engines from the Range Rover in england........more diesel work....yippeeeeee
 

msb71

Virginia Chapter Leader
1,624
28
Hampton,VA
EH, 92-96 models still do the trick for me , with some 97 -03's bringing up the rear, ( HARLEY models I do like) that 09's interior looks very cluttered , Keep it simple is what I say.
 

A_G

wuh?
3,188
74
Tulsa, Ok
Don't know if anyone has said this,but the new Diesel Power magazine has an article on the 2010 150 and they are offering a v6 and v8 diesel in them with the v6 getting 49 mpg(so they say)
they are the engines from the Range Rover in england........more diesel work....yippeeeeee

im glad i chose Diesel as a career. I always thought the diesel was the next step in auto technology. plus with all the semis, your not going to run out of work.
 

polarbear

just growing older not up
12,878
607
Boring, Oregon
I guess I'm kinda old-fashioned on dash design.

I don't want a lot of buttons, but that's largely because I don't want any of the crap they turn on. I do vastly prefer buttons to those infernal touch-screens, though- talk about a nightmare to try to tune in a radio station while you're pulling a trailer in heavy traffic.

The big bars in the grille bother me, too. I understand that with fancy computer models, they can get enough airflow in around them, but why? Especially in a truck (built for work) more airflow is better, and that ugly grill isn't helping that situation.

This is turning into a major pet peeve of mine as I get older and my eyesight deteriorates. WTH designs those dashes with all the itty bitty buttons and controls? Answer- 25 yr old engineers, even though the typical customer that can afford the stuff is twice that age. The epitomy of this is the i-stoopid used in some 5 and 7 series BMW's. Complicated solutions for simple problems.

That was a major gripe of mine in the '06 KR- buttons and switches thrown across the dash in no particular order. Nothing was intuitive- why would power pedals and fog lamps be next to each other? Or who's tried to open the sunroof and gotten the rear slider or trip computer instead?

Not to be outdone, the new Suburbans/Tahoes almost need an orientation class before you pull off of the lot- and that isn't counting the NAV unit, which has it's own set of challenges.
 

RangerPilot

Boom Shaka Laka
2,560
110
Dallas, TX
Complicated solutions for simple problems.

smilieIagree That is the name of the game for any new vehicle it seems.

Remember the days of bare bones, no power steering or brakes, standard shift, manual 4WD and hubs, carburetors and 3,000 mile oil changes? Simple is a thing of the past.

Now we have vehicles with rows of buttons for functions we hardly ever use, engines that require banks of computers to solve ridiculous problems that turn into thousands of dollars of repair after they tear the cab off the truck to get to the engine.

But my biggest gripe is the same as Polarbear's...nothing is intelligently laid out. Switches are located in a seemingly random order, as if they just started building the truck and added the switches as they got ideas for new features randomly.

I'm sorry, I'm a pilot, I like things intelligently laid out so that they're simple and intuitive to understand. I like switches and buttons that you can tell at a quick glance what position they're in. I like simplistic functionality.
 

john112deere

caffeine junkie
Staff member
10,807
405
central Vermont
Not to be outdone, the new Suburbans/Tahoes almost need an orientation class before you pull off of the lot- and that isn't counting the NAV unit, which has it's own set of challenges.

I assume you're referring to the loaded models... Buddy's got an '07 LT Tahoe, and I found the dash to pretty simple.

I didn't fiddle much with the radio- plugged in the iPod, adjusted it (no difficulty, but I wasn't driving) to play off that input, and didn't touch anything but the volume after that, so I can't comment on how hard it is to operate that, but it's got big buttons and is high enough to at least be able to see it. (Mom's Subaru requires a magnifying glass and the fingers of a neurosurgeon to tune the radio- Tahoe isn't that bad.)

But everything else- heat, wipers, mirrors, seat, windows- was right about where you'd expect it to be if you've driven more than a handful of decently equipped cars in the last decade. (Then there's guys like my Dad get flustered if they can't find the window crank...but I think he's a special case.)

Ernie- you've said that a vast majority of people buy fully loaded vehicles, at least in the full-size truck and SUV market. Do you ever sometimes wonder if the buyers might be happier with a vehicle with fewer features, that they could operate easily, as opposed to so much crap they couldn't remember how to turn any of it on? I know I'm a long way from the typical car-buyer, but I know plenty of people who've got cars with loads of features they can't use... e.g.- my aunt's got a 2001 Volvo with 145k, that she bought new. She has no idea how to turn the fog lignts on, or even why there are two foglight switches (rear fog light, too- Swedish car). And she's a smart, mechanically competent person...
 

polarbear

just growing older not up
12,878
607
Boring, Oregon
I assume you're referring to the loaded models... Buddy's got an '07 LT Tahoe, and I found the dash to pretty simple.

I didn't fiddle much with the radio- plugged in the iPod, adjusted it (no difficulty, but I wasn't driving) to play off that input, and didn't touch anything but the volume after that, so I can't comment on how hard it is to operate that, but it's got big buttons and is high enough to at least be able to see it. (Mom's Subaru requires a magnifying glass and the fingers of a neurosurgeon to tune the radio- Tahoe isn't that bad.)

But everything else- heat, wipers, mirrors, seat, windows- was right about where you'd expect it to be if you've driven more than a handful of decently equipped cars in the last decade. (Then there's guys like my Dad get flustered if they can't find the window crank...but I think he's a special case.)

Ernie- you've said that a vast majority of people buy fully loaded vehicles, at least in the full-size truck and SUV market. Do you ever sometimes wonder if the buyers might be happier with a vehicle with fewer features, that they could operate easily, as opposed to so much crap they couldn't remember how to turn any of it on? I know I'm a long way from the typical car-buyer, but I know plenty of people who've got cars with loads of features they can't use... e.g.- my aunt's got a 2001 Volvo with 145k, that she bought new. She has no idea how to turn the fog lignts on, or even why there are two foglight switches (rear fog light, too- Swedish car). And she's a smart, mechanically competent person...

Separate the truck/SUV market- completely different buyers. The SUV market is strictly a luxury station wagon market, and it's still a "full-meal-deal" buyer. By that I mean Nav/Roof/Backup camera/Rear DVD at the minimum. The only exceptions seem to be the Enterprise rent-a-cars (I've delivered 30 or 40 of those this year to them).

Trucks, on the other hand, go out the door with less equipment on them in general. I'm having terrific luck with work trucks this year (crank windows, cruise, tow, and the chrome on the outside). Oddly, no one else stocks them.

Otherwise, the hot sellers are Aveos (basic), Cobalts (basic), Malibu's (lower-end cars), Impalas (high end only), HHR's (mix), and Colorados (ditto).
Can't remember the last time I sold out of Impalas- three times this year though, and Chevy's having trouble getting me more.
 

john112deere

caffeine junkie
Staff member
10,807
405
central Vermont
Separate the truck/SUV market- completely different buyers. The SUV market is strictly a luxury station wagon market, and it's still a "full-meal-deal" buyer. By that I mean Nav/Roof/Backup camera/Rear DVD at the minimum.
Nav (which I think is 100 times as complicated and 1/10 as useful as map, not to mention irritating as all hell- I refuse to believe I'm the only guy who wants a big, red "STFU and stay that way" button right next to the screen, either) aside, I guess I can see why most people with money to spend want that on their people-movers.

polarbear said:

This surprises me...I hardly ever see Colorados or Canyons around here, a few fleet vehicles excepted.
 

polarbear

just growing older not up
12,878
607
Boring, Oregon
Hey Ernie, since Enterprise is headquartered here, are the checks for said vehicles cut here or are they local? Just curious...

Neither- they pay by VISA.
shocked.gif
. Serious. They've got an interesting thing going with GM- units get billed out directly to Enterprise at some unknown number (they cut their own deal with the manufacturer). We get paid whatever profit we agreed on and the fees for title and tags. In the event of a out-of-stock purchase, the unit gets re-invoiced to Enterprise, and we get the same deal. I assume they floorplan their stuff in a similiar fashion that the dealerships do.
 

john112deere

caffeine junkie
Staff member
10,807
405
central Vermont
Neither- they pay by VISA.
shocked.gif
.

The Ford store down the road from my father's house has a little sign hanging in the showroom, says they don't accept credit cards for vehicle purchases...

Why? Because my grandfather used a credit card to purchase a portion of Grandma's Mustang. He had the cash, but got some % back from the CC, so he paid that way and then paid the bill off in full. They were NOT impressed.
 

TexasNomad

FTFS Designated DRINKER!
I think its a very nice looking truck. But I think its lost that take me out and work the hell out of me I can take what ever you throw at me look and feel..
They look soccer mom trucks.. I'll stick with the 70s and mids 97s, but still a very nice looking office truck..
 

TexasNomad

FTFS Designated DRINKER!
Does any one know any thing about the Ford boss Truck? how much is it gonna run and is it going to be badder then the Lighting or another under powered over priced joke.
 

polarbear

just growing older not up
12,878
607
Boring, Oregon
Ford just announced today the new F150 is gonna get shoved back a few months- maybe more- while they work their way through unsold current-style pickups. My guess is they spend a minimum of R&D money in this segment while they rush the Euro-Ford prooduct line into showrooms.

Dodge has to questioning their sanity introducing a new full-size pickup in a few months- talk about impeccable timing! Of course, gas prices rocketed upwards about 10 minutes after the new Tundra was introduced. I see they're moving production to the one Texas plant, and talking an extended furlough at the same time. They aren't having any better luck selling a 13 mpg pickup.
 

john112deere

caffeine junkie
Staff member
10,807
405
central Vermont
My guess is they spend a minimum of R&D money in this segment while they rush the Euro-Ford prooduct line into showrooms.

Does this mean we'll actually be seeing some of those Fords that they sell in Europe? Or will Ford botch this as badly as, well, history suggests they will?
 
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