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Ford Introduces Three New Light-Duty Engines for 2011 F-150 Pickup Trucks

Ford Introduces Three New Light-Duty Engines for 2011 F-150 Pickup Trucks


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F 150Cobra

"Wild HoRsE" Got Torque?
3,642
104
Aruba
F150 5.0 history do repeats itself :)
 

Fordzilla80

Ranger Lariat
6,372
262
FL
Is Ford using Triple Overhead Cams yet?

Impressive number, unexciting engine designs.

There's just something about an old Ford blue pre smog 7.5 460 that gets me excited and makes me feel all fuzzy inside.

There's something about a shade tree mechanic's nightmare covered in plastic that make me feel nauseous and want to fall asleep.
 
Is Ford using Triple Overhead Cams yet?

Impressive number, unexciting engine designs.

There's just something about an old Ford blue pre smog 7.5 460 that gets me excited and makes me feel all fuzzy inside.

There's something about a shade tree mechanic's nightmare covered in plastic that make me feel nauseous and want to fall asleep.

Exactly, you could build a 460 in a garage with a pretty small amount of tools, try doing that with an eco-boost. I'm not happy with the eco-boost being rated with higher towing that the 5.0, I'm really wondering if high revving turbo V6 can do the the job of a low revving naturally aspirated V8 with the same ease and reliability.
 

DNFXDLI

The Token Canadian
Staff member
Exactly, you could build a 460 in a garage with a pretty small amount of tools, try doing that with an eco-boost. I'm not happy with the eco-boost being rated with higher towing that the 5.0, I'm really wondering if high revving turbo V6 can do the the job of a low revving naturally aspirated V8 with the same ease and reliability.

Where do you get the high revving from?...in MKT trim, torque is all in at 1500 and is flat to 5000..I would hardly call that high revving.
 

DNFXDLI

The Token Canadian
Staff member
I'm just figuring vs a large V8.

As much as I am old school, the new technology on these engines is gonna run circles around the old ones...I don't like it, but with direct injection, advanced EMS...it's happening. And on top of that, they are going to return much better economy.
 

LEB Ben

Arrogant A-hole At-Large
34,919
1,124
outside your house
There's just something about an old Ford blue pre smog 7.5 460 that gets me excited and makes me feel all fuzzy inside.

There's something about a shade tree mechanic's nightmare covered in plastic that make me feel nauseous and want to fall asleep.

I'm the same way man. I think it's basically because I'm afraid of it...and barely even understand carb'd engines...much less this new stuff. But I will say, it almost seems like the auto companies are trying to eliminate the shade tree mechanic. After all, there is more revenue in having customers come in to have there vehicles worked on than doing it at home by themselves. I just wonder how these systems will hold up 30-40 years from now, will they have entire websites dedicated to them with guys bringing them down the strip like 460ford and whatnot.

As much as I am old school, the new technology on these engines is gonna run circles around the old ones...I don't like it, but with direct injection, advanced EMS...it's happening. And on top of that, they are going to return much better economy.


I was afraid of that. Makes me wonder what they could do with the same technology on bigger displacement engines. I think I could get excited over a '460' with the new tech.
 

BKW

Ford Parts Guru
But I will say, it almost seems like the auto companies are trying to eliminate the shade tree mechanic. After all, there is more revenue in having customers come in to have there vehicles worked on than doing it at home by themselves. I just wonder how these systems will hold up 30-40 years from now, will they have entire websites dedicated to them with guys bringing them down the strip like 460ford and whatnot.
When the automakers went to computers in the 1980's, that was the first nail in the coffin for shade tree mechanics.

These engine changes have a lot to do with CAFE standards.

30 or 40 years from now...I would be more concerned about the availability of oil, then worrying about whether the engines are gonna hold up...or not.

When I was in high school, predictions were that the world would run out of oil by 2000. Of course, that was 50 years ago, so there have been quite a few new discoveries since.

btw: Ford has a nationwide promotion to drive the new 2011 F150's. I signed up for 11/18/2010 event @ Autoclub Motor Speedway in Fontana CA.
 
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DNFXDLI

The Token Canadian
Staff member
When the automakers went to computers in the 1980's, that was the first nail in the coffin for shade tree mechanics.

These engine changes have a lot to do with CAFE standards.

30 or 40 years from now...I would be more concerned about the availability of oil, then worrying about whether the engines are gonna hold up...or not.

When I was in high school, predictions were that the world would run out of oil by 2000. Of course, that was 50 years ago, so there have been quite a few new discoveries since.

Still...

My thoughts....there is a chitload of oil/gas out there...peak oil was based on available info at the time. We are not going to run out anytime soon.
With enhanced recovery and advanced extraction procedures oil is going to be around for a long time.
As far as alternates go....they leave a way bigger "carbon footprint" than the sandal wearing tree hugging hippies will have you believe. Engines are running cleaner and more efficiently...and will continue to get better and better.
 

DNFXDLI

The Token Canadian
Staff member
What you save in gas times three will go into the mechanic's wallet come time for an oil change or major repair.

No different than other things these days.
 

DNFXDLI

The Token Canadian
Staff member
Yep, so fuel economy means chit these days.

How so?..if the mileage was crap and the expense of repairs was high, there is no offset....and really, the vehicles as a whole are more reliable....and there are way more vehicles on the road these days...so comparing numbers of repairs now to 25 years ago is skewed.
 

A_G

wuh?
3,188
74
Tulsa, Ok
take the eco boost turbos off and shove them on the 6.2l thats a win right there...

I mean a 3.5l v6 with 400hp (est.) and a 6.2l v8 with 411hp that aint right. 11 more hp for 2.7 more liters...not right
 

Fordzilla80

Ranger Lariat
6,372
262
FL
How so?..if the mileage was crap and the expense of repairs was high, there is no offset....and really, the vehicles as a whole are more reliable....and there are way more vehicles on the road these days...so comparing numbers of repairs now to 25 years ago is skewed.

What I meant was consumers save money in gas. Great. But how much will you actually save in the long run? If someone were to have one of these fuel efficient cars for 100,000 miles, then will what they save in gas be enough to rebuild or replace the engine and or transmission? Especially with all these sensors? Look at old vs new. My dad had his 1994 C6 rebuilt for $600. My mom's Cavalier was looking at a $2,000+ transmission rebuild. In a few years, that price could double with the increasing technology. So will $20 saved in gas add up to $4,000 within 100,000 miles?

I suck at numbers, and statistics, so what I just typed is what I want to know.
 

LEB Ben

Arrogant A-hole At-Large
34,919
1,124
outside your house
^^^I get what you're saying Shaun. And we went through this same dilemma for my gf when it came to 'does she want a hybrid or not'. Even when she had a 110 mile round trip commute, she woulda had to have the vehicle 10 years to make up the difference in sticker prices in gas savings. Not only that, there are now two systems to maintain that will cost bigger money than yester-years technology. And on top of that, who keeps a vehicle for 10 years anymore????? Unless of course it's a restore or has sentimental value.


But then I also see what Duncan is saying, more vehicles does mean more problems on the whole...but what percentage is that when compared to overall vehicles. For all we know, there might have been issues with 26% of all vehicles equipped with a C6, but since only 200,000 vehicles were sold with C6's it's gonna show less problems than the 18% of problems of X transmission in 500,000 vehicles. The C6 has 52,000 problems, Tranny X has 90,000 problems, when there are less problems per vehicle that have tranny X.
 

DNFXDLI

The Token Canadian
Staff member
What I meant was consumers save money in gas. Great. But how much will you actually save in the long run? If someone were to have one of these fuel efficient cars for 100,000 miles, then will what they save in gas be enough to rebuild or replace the engine and or transmission? Especially with all these sensors? Look at old vs new. My dad had his 1994 C6 rebuilt for $600. My mom's Cavalier was looking at a $2,000+ transmission rebuild. In a few years, that price could double with the increasing technology. So will $20 saved in gas add up to $4,000 within 100,000 miles?

I suck at numbers, and statistics, so what I just typed is what I want to know.

There is arguements both ways....the vehicles are becoming more reliable with ample warnings if something is amiss.
100,000 miles at 35 mpg at $3.50 a gallon...$10000
100,000 miles at 20 mpg at $3.50 a gallon...$17500
$7500 difference in fuel alone.
Edit....what Ben said is also what I was referring to.
It is the way vehicles are going....I don't like it much either...hell, I look under the hood of the MKT and just cringe about something happening.
 

Fordzilla80

Ranger Lariat
6,372
262
FL
^^^I get what you're saying Shaun. And we went through this same dilemma for my gf when it came to 'does she want a hybrid or not'. Even when she had a 110 mile round trip commute, she woulda had to have the vehicle 10 years to make up the difference in sticker prices in gas savings. Not only that, there are now two systems to maintain that will cost bigger money than yester-years technology. And on top of that, who keeps a vehicle for 10 years anymore????? Unless of course it's a restore or has sentimental value.


But then I also see what Duncan is saying, more vehicles does mean more problems on the whole...but what percentage is that when compared to overall vehicles. For all we know, there might have been issues with 26% of all vehicles equipped with a C6, but since only 200,000 vehicles were sold with C6's it's gonna show less problems than the 18% of problems of X transmission in 500,000 vehicles. The C6 has 52,000 problems, Tranny X has 90,000 problems, when there are less problems per vehicle that have tranny X.

I understand what he says too. But one thing we don't know is with a growing population, will the need for more cars rise too? If we produce more cars, will quality go down the drain? I mean, Ford had numerous vehicles catch on fire because of that dang CCDS. That's not something that can just be passed off. Texas Instruments obviously poorly designed the switch, and somehow overlooked the scenario of materials degrading and brake fluid getting into the switch. So if quality goes down, there's a good chance the amount of problems will go up. When you fatigue your workers, quality will go down the drain. If Jeff, the door assembler at Ford, puts 60 doors together in one day, but all of a sudden has to assemble 100, he's gonna have a hard time keeping up, and there's likely to be mistakes made. But with everybody being so frugal these days, Ford doesn't hire any more door assemblers, so Jeff will continue to have to assemble 40 more doors than he is used to. But now we're getting into economics and business, and that's where I am ignorant, so I'll have to end it at that.
 
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