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Wondering what you fellas would do?

taxreliever

Licensed to Represent!
14,695
287
Maine


smilieFordlogo smilieFordlogo
 
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DNFXDLI

The Token Canadian
Staff member
What are you talking about Duncan? The wire nuts? In order to disconnect the electric motor, you have to cut the three wires connected to the speed sensor (which you won't need anymore - thus no electric motor), so instead of having 3 wires just dangling, he provides these to cover them in case you want to resplice them and hook up another motor down the road or something, to avoid them getting corrosion and what not.

Ahhh...my mistake...however, a much better solution would be just a piece of heat shrink with a sealant over the ends of the wire. Those connectors will not provide any corrosion resistance at all.
If you go the heat shrink route, you slide about 1''-1.5'' ove the wire and leave about 1/2'' over the end...then when you heat it up, you take a pair of pliers and squeeze the end of the shrink that is not on the wire...that will ensure that moisture doesn't propogate down the wire.
 

taxreliever

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There are afew guys over on the explorer forum that made a manual shifter that can be shifted from in the cab. Some use flex shafts others used a 90° drill Chuck to get the rods into the cab.

Now that I might be interested in and would love to see...probably similar to the Shiftster 2 coming out....but even this one does everything I need it to do. I will be in 4H a half dozen times this winter and will probably only put a couple hundred miles on my Bronco all winter. BTW, the Tcase is close enough where I can literally pull the plunger and shift it without even putting my knee on the ground.

Randy, is that thread, or part, in the other forum easy for you to send me? Just out of curiosity.
 

taxreliever

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There are afew guys over on the explorer forum that made a manual shifter that can be shifted from in the cab. Some use flex shafts others used a 90° drill Chuck to get the rods into the cab.

Ahhh...my mistake...however, a much better solution would be just a piece of heat shrink with a sealant over the ends of the wire. Those connectors will not provide any corrosion resistance at all.
If you go the heat shrink route, you slide about 1''-1.5'' ove the wire and leave about 1/2'' over the end...then when you heat it up, you take a pair of pliers and squeeze the end of the shrink that is not on the wire...that will ensure that moisture doesn't propogate down the wire.

Ahhh...yeah, that does sound far better....in that little 8 minute (6 minutes too long - but not for someone like me) video, he mentions that if you want to put electrical tape to help, you can. But the heat shrink idea sounds better. I'm not sure I'll ever want or need to put the motor on there again.
 

taxreliever

Licensed to Represent!
14,695
287
Maine
2012-09-11_21-26-00_26.jpg


So if you see the black notch and the 4H mark, the hole to the left, which is less than 1.5 inches is how much you'd need to turn it to get to 2H. The 4L hole is way on the other side, about a 300 degree twist from that first hole to the left, which I doubt I'll ever need. I don't go wheeling or mudding or work with my trucks...that's what my POS Dodge is for. smilieFordlogo
 

DNFXDLI

The Token Canadian
Staff member
Electrical tape won't help either...what happens is that moisture will creep down the wire between the copper strands and insulation...eventually corroding the wire for a long way rendering it useless...battery cables are good for doing this.
Even though you might not ever anticipate using that motor again , one day you might sell it and it's always a bonus to be able to put it back to factory easily.
If you do heat shrink it, you need to get the stuff with sealant and a 3:1 shrink ratio works well.
 

taxreliever

Licensed to Represent!
14,695
287
Maine
Electrical tape won't help either...what happens is that moisture will creep down the wire between the copper strands and insulation...eventually corroding the wire for a long way rendering it useless...battery cables are good for doing this.
Even though you might not ever anticipate using that motor again , one day you might sell it and it's always a bonus to be able to put it back to factory easily.
If you do heat shrink it, you need to get the stuff with sealant and a 3:1 shrink ratio works well.

Duncan, the thought of selling it, was really the ONLY thought that came to my mind that might cause me to reinstall this thing. Someone already offered me a few bucks for the motor, which is still running, but I think for the few bucks I'll get for it, I'll just throw it in a Bronco box and put it in my garage.
 

DNFXDLI

The Token Canadian
Staff member
I didn't mean the motor...I meant the Bronco :D
 

taxreliever

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I'll send you the link tomorrow.its on my PC I'm on my phone now. If I forget shoot me a pm.

Thanks Randy....hey I've been going through the music and I think it's going to take me months to even listen to it all just once.....I'm only on disk 3 and have been sorting some of my favs to copy for my rides.....THANKS AGAIN!!!
 

taxreliever

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I didn't mean the motor...I meant the Bronco :D

That's what I meant too.....I think I posted too soon about the guy wanting the little shifter motor....smilietease

If I ever sold the Bronco, that would be the only reason I could think of for wanting to reinstall this little shifter motor......
 

DNFXDLI

The Token Canadian
Staff member
Hehe..I guess it is one of my pet peeves when I see or hear of a hokey wiring fix when it would have been simple to do in a way that wouldn't cause any later issues.
I've got a couple of them with my own wiring harnesses on the 79 :icon_mecker:
 

taxreliever

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Hehe..I guess it is one of my pet peeves when I see or hear of a hokey wiring fix when it would have been simple to do in a way that wouldn't cause any later issues.
I've got a couple of them with my own wiring harnesses on the 79 :icon_mecker:

Ummmm....Duncan....can't believe you're even mentioning your build in the same sentence in a thread with my Bronco......like already mentioned before....the way you're building that thing will be twice as good as when it originally rolled off the factory floor and will probably outlast any vehicle on the planet! :wavey:
 

DNFXDLI

The Token Canadian
Staff member
Thanks for the compliment, but your Bronco is a fine example of a vehicle in great shape!!!
 

BuzzGun79

Nov.TOTM 2012 / 2012 TOTY
2,388
55
Ken,would you be so kind to send me the information that you recieved from smokey on the shifter? thanks

just some tips on 4wd that i do to prevent trouble along with preventative maintenance

1) 4wd is used in off road situations,along with adverse weather conditions only they are not intended for dry road situations simply you dont need it.

2) during spring ,summer months I will engage the system on a dry road once a week,drive the vehicle 2-3 miles to keep non moving parts lubricated at lower speeds that normally would not move in 2wd.in short this keeps the universals or cvc drive shafts from freezing up in non use months,along with front differential,transfer case lubrication

3) check those grease levels in transfer case's differentials frequently,grease all fittings (u-joints,front end parts,shifters ect) monthly,inspect for trouble or wear,more so if exposed to water,keep those wheel bearing,hubs,lockouts well greased at all times.use a quality wheel bearing grease of choice DO NOT USE NEVER SEIZE ON WHEEL BEARINGS HUBS OR LOCKOUTS! your just asking for trouble

4)follow the manufactor's safety precautions on 4wd,they are not intended for high speeds in most cases 50-55 is the safe limit in 4hi

5) sometimes in older manual shift transfer cases with wheel lockouts system will bind in 4wd and difficult to disengage,simply drive the vehicle in reverse about 10' and it should disengage.this relieves any forward tension that the vehicle may be experiencing.

follow these simple guide lines will give you great service along with long lasting life of the systems.
 
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taxreliever

Licensed to Represent!
14,695
287
Maine
Ken,would you be so kind to send me the information that you recieved from smokey on the shifter? thanks

just some tips on 4wd that i do to prevent trouble along with preventative maintenance

1) 4wd is used in off road situations,along with adverse weather conditions only they are not intended for dry road situations simply you dont need it.

2) during spring ,summer months I will engage the system on a dry road once a week,drive the vehicle 2-3 miles to keep non moving parts lubricated at lower speeds that normally would not move in 2wd.in short this keeps the universals or cvc drive shafts from freezing up in non use months,along with front differential,transfer case lubrication

3) check those grease levels in transfer case's differentials frequently,grease all fittings (u-joints,front end parts,shifters ect) monthly,inspect for trouble or wear,more so if exposed to water,keep those wheel bearing,hubs,lockouts well greased at all times.use a quality wheel bearing grease of choice DO NOT USE NEVER SEIZE ON WHEEL BEARINGS HUBS OR LOCKOUTS! your just asking for trouble

4)follow the manufactor's safety precautions on 4wd,they are not intended for high speeds in most cases 50-55 is the safe limit in 4hi

5) sometimes in older manual shift transfer cases with wheel lockouts system will bind in 4wd and difficult to disengage,simply drive the vehicle in reverse about 10' and it should disengage.this relieves any forward tension that the vehicle may be experiencing.

follow these simple guide lines will give you great service along with long lasting life of the systems.

Could use all the tips I can get....I'm learning thanks!

1) Yup, am going to use periodically in the winter months for in town driving only and probably never on the highway.

2) I have heard this from others as well....what would you consider safe speeds, the 50-55 you mentioned?

3) On the ujoints and hubs, are there fittings ready to be greased, or do I need to take things apart? I think I remember in another thread where I changed my auto hubs to manuals, it was recommended to pack some grease behind the hubs on the wheel bearings....this seems like a bit of a job for me.

4) Like I said, probably won't be on the highway and mostly in town driving.

5) Is this true even in manual locking hubs?

THANKS AGAIN! Working late tonight, so this is a good break for me.
 

BuzzGun79

Nov.TOTM 2012 / 2012 TOTY
2,388
55
Hi Ken to answer your questions......

1) I do not use 4wd on the highway either...unless in winter when it is real bad 3" of snow or more is my basis, and speeds are lower that 55

2) 50-55 is the maximum safe operation for 4wd in a stock vehicle period! sure some push the issue..however your taking a big costly risk in doing so.

3) some universals are sealed units requiring no service.Others look for fittings on the universals that stick out on regular (older shafts)drive shafts on newer shafts that have multiple joints there is a small circle area in the middle of the joint in between the cup areas for a pointed type grease gun to access
CVC Driveshafts,if no issues with the joints,pull back the boots and simply stuff some grease inside the boot and reassemble to keep out dirt.if boots are ripped replace them immediately..but chances are the cvc joint already
has been exposed to dirt,the shaft will have to be removed serviced,reinstalled,Once a cvc joint has been exposed from boot failure unless quickly caught, the life of the joint has been sacrificed greatly.
universals joints on front differentials,(older models)these are located behind the hubs on the axleshafts in order for the front wheels to steer.some have the fittings i described above,some are self contained(sealed) and cannot be serviced

4) under normal use Ken I repack the wheel bearings when brake pads are being serviced,remove the hub rotor assembly from the vehicle or have a proffesional do it for you if your not comfortable doing it yourself.it can be challenging for the inexperienced home mechanic.Being you just got the Bronco and had the lockouts replaced,my self i would have packed them for piece of mind in a vehicle that i have not had before.a fresh start so to speak.20,000 miles is normal life for bearing grease under normal use.
I check hub bearing grease at 10,000 mile intervalls(thats just me being cautious),after a brake job has been performed or other hub service.here again more if the vehicle is exposed to water.Grant it some of todays models have sealed hubs,Jeeps for example,these require no service other than replacing when they fail.

5) sometimes manual locking hubs will bind in 4wd and will not return to the free position(my 79 does it) backing the vehicle up 10' relieves the tension,to reset the lockouts.This is normal,do not think the worst.

No prolblem Ken..glad to be of assistance!
 
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taxreliever

Licensed to Represent!
14,695
287
Maine
I didn't see any mention of a gasket or o-ring in the video when the shifter was being installed. Does it have one ?

Nope and neither does the motor or did the motor. So, question is, is it high enough where it doesn't matter and the bolt on is enough for no seepage, or does the shifter pin sticking out of the Tcase have some kind of seal on it?
 

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